Tag Archives: T.H.I.N.K.

Social Media and Your Child

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Thank you to all the parents who came to our workshop today and shared in our learning community.  Please do not stop asking questions as they are essential to our personal and communal reflection, learning and growth.

 

This presentation is both a sharing of my passion for the potential impact on student learning that social media presents and a mix of the incredible teachers whose insight I have already harvested to share this presentation with you.

Thank you to (great people to follow and learn from):

Ben Halpert – Author of Savvy Cyber Kids series’ – @SavvyCyberKids

Beth Holland – Instructor with EdTechTeacher and Writer for Edutopia and Edudemic – @brholland

Dean Shareski – Community Manager for Discovery Education Canada – @shareski

Gregory Kulowiec – EdTechTeacher  Presenter and Workshop Trainer – @gregkulowiec

Kevin Honeycutt- Artist, Global Speaker and Tech Integration Specialist – @kevinhoneycutt

Lev Grossman – Author and Book Critic – @leverus

Lisa Nielsen – Author, Speaker and Professional Development Specialist – @InnovativeEdu

Matt Gomez – Kindergarten teacher and #kinderchat moderator – @mattBgomez

Sandy Kendell – Educational Tech Specialist and Perpetual learner – @EdTechSandyK

Sir Ken Robinson – Leader in the Development of Creativity, Innovation and Human Resources in Education – @SirKenRobinson

 

 

 

 

 

 

Twitter: Moving from Communication to Connection

Teacher: So, I have been reading tweets and of course tweeting some stuff myself. I wanted to know if you are looking for quantity or quality in terms of our tweets. Meaning—is it beneficial for us to tweet something if it is not explained well or if the picture is unclear.

ME: This is a great question.  The goal is certainly not one of quantity, but rather quality. And, I would certainly not suggest unclear photo tweeting and/or meaningless tweets.  That being said, it is important to realize we are only in the first phase of our twitter initiative, and we are currently using twitter as a means of documenting and communicating cute or powerful lessons from the classroom.  This certainly does not mean that every tweet needs a picture, as there have been some great tweets without links, photos or attachments.  The next step, and I think the bigger payoff, is when our tweets start to encompass connections.  Connecting a tweet about our students working on a Georgia landform project with another 3rd grade class elsewhere in order to see photos or info about their studies of their own regions and/or connecting our student’s book reports and research papers with authors, organizations, community experts…etc. is the ultimate goal, as this will still serve the first purpose as well as unlock the true learning potential.  Unfortunately I think it requires familiarity with the first before being comfortable enough to move to the second type.  Therefore I do think quantity is relevant even if not most important.

An example of dipping our toe in to phase two, below is the tweet that I just send of a picture that Julie’s kids made using the Wordfoto app.  When I tweeted it, I included @wordfoto (this is the designers handle) and the #kinderchat (this is the kindergarten teacher hashtag).  Though there is certainly no guarantee of making a connection, but the possibility that the designer or another kindergarten teacher will see this and reach out to us to connect with Julie’s class now exists. I am well aware that this may look like a foreign language or feel overwhelming.  I promise that I will assist in making the transition from phase one to phase two.

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Earlier this week I received this email regarding our current twitter initiative.  In drafting my response I realized that there was great value in the interaction. First, I was pleased to even be engaging in such a discussion where we could be discussing evidence of implementation to reflect on future directions.  With our initiative being 3 weeks young, the more than 400 tweets display as much about the amazing culture of learning and innovation amongst our faculty team as the actual tweets and photos show about our wonderful culture of community and love.  That the producers of Davis content on twitter has gone from 5 or 6 to over 60 in 3 weeks is another reinforcement of this.

The process of growing and learning is inherently incremental.  Before we can walk, we crawl (most of us). Before we can program computers, we engage in computers.  Unlocking the learning potential that twitter provides for students and teachers will take a similar incremental approach.  Our daily tweets from all members of our community sharing the great success of our students and teachers is a solid start to this end.  Making the change to include more opportunities for global and “expert” connections for our students is the 2nd phase.  While we are fully engaged in phase 1, I can already see some nice beginnings of the transition to this second phase with references to authors, publishers, and community organizations coming across our hashtags in the past 3 days.

I look forward to building on the momentum of a great first three weeks with this initiative, transitioning more solidly in to a phase of connection, and looking ahead to helping students and teachers find, build, and share with a powerful and meaningful PLN in the 3rd phase.

Lean into the Learning

THINK

 

While we can tell students again and again and again and again to protect their online identity, to make wise decisions, and to present oneself online as they would in person, often these are lessons that are only capable of being learned through experience.

Just this week a wonderful example of this presented itself, and while others would shy away due to the use of and fear of their children/students being exposed to certain language particularly in schools, I an adamant that we need to lean in to the learning, not shy away of the fear.  These opportunities may present far greater lifetime learning payoffs than the risks and should be harnessed for this greater good (I am in no ways saying that this can or should be done without supervision or adult discretion).

In our fourth grade 21st century learning class, @21ststacy presented a great lesson using todaysmeet.com to engage students in a discussion about whit is means to be brave during the first week of school (http://todaysmeet.com/firstweek).  The students were engaged in and enjoyed the lesson, and they were excited when Stacy shared it with our school families as well as her followers on twitter. A person who follows Stacy saw the lesson and decided to comment.

“What an amazing lesson.  I wish our school did cool shit like this”

We use the “Think Chart” above with students to help them reflect before we post anything on any social network site (but this could and should also translate to reflection before emailing, texting or speaking).

T is it true?

H is it helpful?

I is it inspiring?

N is it necessary?

K is it kind?

Certainly reflecting on the “Think Chart” in response to the comment, one could raise whether the use of profanity is necessary and whether profanity in a response to a school or anyone is kind. The real lessons here are in opportunity lost and opportunities presented.

From an opportunity lost prospective:  If the commenter had said the same comment without the profanity: “What an amazing lesson.  I wish our school did cool stuff like this,” it would have been an opening or a chance for us to connect with the commenter and maybe set up a classroom connection or a Skype chat.  Furthermore, had the presenters said “What an amazing lesson.  Our schools does similar lessons with (padlet, edmodo…etc),” it would have been an opportunity for us to build on our CLN (classroom learning network) by adding a new source four us to learn from.

From an opportunity gained perspective: The use of the single word of profanity in his comment has changed it from a post that creates connection and allows our students to meet other communities to a powerful learning tool.  We learn by doing and experiencing. Though we would love for our student and children to learn from things we say and the warnings and guidance we offer them, it is unfortunately in the mistakes that we make or experience that the most meaningful and long term learn occur.  As the students joy for the activity and the sharing of this activity have created investment for them, the comment can present disappointment at the “sullying” of their effort.  We can and must now share with them that this comment and harness the learning opportunity to discuss our, their, and this commenter’s digital footprint.  We must let them know that employers, colleges, and organizations search for an applicant’s digital footprint and look for the ways in which the model their online self vs. their in-person self.  This commenter has now created an entry in their digital portfolio in which they respond to elementary classes and teachers with profanity. We must ask them to reflect about whether it matters that the intentions of the commenter would good, as he was clearly giving credit to the work that the class had done, or whether the single error in judgment would be the impact of this contribution to his digital footprint.

No one wants their kids exposed to some of the profanity that they see regularly in the movies, news, and on the web.  As teachers, however, we have to lean into these learning opportunities. Yes, it is our primary job and want to keep our kids safe, but safety is not achieved not preparing them and making sure that they themselves are making decisions on social networks and across digital platforms that represent their best self.  They must have exposure, training, and the modeling to use these tools in a positive way to harness their benefit and to contribute always with the idea in mind, “is it true, is it helpful, is it inspiring, is it necessary is, and most importantly is it kind?”